The Delusional Premises of Alexandria Ocasio Cortez

“Do we see largely that it’s the global south and communities of color that may be bearing the brunt of the initial havoc from climate change? – Without a doubt. – And in terms of that wealth, the people that are producing climate change, the folks that are responsible for the largest amount of emissions, or communities or corporations, they tend to be predominantly white, correct? – Yes, and every study backs that up.” – Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, Congressional Hearings on Climate and Race, October 2019

Welcome to yet another example of the nexus between climate change alarm and a socialist redistribution agenda that relies on fueling racial resentment. That may be old news to those of us paying attention, but thanks to birdbrained stooges like “AOC,” the blatant race baiting rhetoric is being turned up a notch.

And why not? If you’re a socialist, or a globalist, there is only upside to tagging nations of European heritage with guilt for the problems facing their “communities of color,” or the problems in the rest of the non-European world. It would be far too painful to consider the alternative explanation, which is that socialism, in all of its antecedents and derivatives, is the primary cause of the societal afflictions that plague “people of color” both in America and abroad.

Deconstructing Alexandria Ocasio Cortez’s convoluted logic isn’t intellectually hard, but the implications are hard indeed, at least for anyone who shares her delusional world view. Her arguments rest on three premises […] Read More

The Great Cull, or the Long Boom?

When people look back on world history one hundred years from now, what will they see? It is reasonable to suggest they will see a global civilization, back in 2020, that was facing unprecedented challenges and transformations.

The primary challenge, arguably, is a global population that has quintupled between 1900 and 2020. The most transformative factor, an explosion of technology that has taken us from steel and steam in 1900 to quantum mechanics and genetic engineering in 2020.

An optimist would look the last few decades and conclude that, despite the challenges, humanity is on a relentless march towards a better quality of life for everyone. An article published by the BBC earlier this year lists several reasons “why the world is improving,” including rising life expectancy, falling infant mortality, falling rates of fertility, ongoing GDP growth, less income inequality, the spread of democracy, and fewer armed conflicts.

This argument for what Wired Magazine once called the “Long Boom” is embodied in the philosophy of “New Optimism,” with its principal proponent the Danish economist Bjorn Lomborg. According to Lomborg, “air and water are getting cleaner, endangered species and forests are holding their own, and the risks associated with global warming are exaggerated.” He contends that “more people than ever before, living in all parts of the globe, are becoming healthier, richer, and better educated; that the human race is living longer and more peaceably; that we’re considerably freer to pursue our happiness.” Lomborg predicts that in […] Read More